Makita Brushless (TINY) Impact Driver – DTD148

Makita has lots of 18v impact drivers, so why bother reviewing the umpteenth revamp? Because this one is a groundbreaker. Its so tiny! At a length of just 119mm (that’s 4.7” for the unhappy folks living in the 19th century), its hardly bigger than your hand.

You could (but won’t) be excused for thinking its a toy, but its specs put it ahead of the competition.

  • Length: 119mm
  • Torque: 175Nm
  • 3-Speed: 0-1100, 0-2100, 0-3600 RPM
  • Weight: 0.88kg (bare) or 1.4 kg with full size battery
  • Built-in LED battery indicator

It feels great in the hand, is super fast driving all sized fasteners and will fit almost anywhere your hand can. Its basically a smaller, torquier version of the previous (awesome) brushless impact driver, the DTD145.

Any dislikes? Only the price. At $270ish you’ll be walking crooked (I’m not sure that’s a thing), so it might pay to wait for a price drop. Watch the video!

 

Makita Brushless Grinder Review – DGA504Z

Makita has forayed into brushless 18v tools before now, but never outside the standard tools. They’ve got brushless drills, impact drivers and rotary hammer drill, like many other brands. But Makita is launching brushless technology into other important tools, and spearheading the move with the brushless grinders, DGA504Z and DGA505Z.

This is a great move from Makita because while their standard 18v grinder (DGA452Z) does the job, it is criticised for being a little underpowered. The new brushless models are anything but underpowered. As you’ll see in the video below, stopping this cordless grinder is no easy talk, it just refuses to give up. You may consider leaving your corded grinder at home with this in your toolbag.

With great power and longer runtime, the most important boxes are ticked. Other nice features of this tool include:

  • Available with regular switch (504) or paddle (505)
  • Reduced size handle for better grip
  • Toolless guard rotation and removal
  • Rotatable head for angle flexibility
  • Compatability with 1.5Ah, 3.0Ah, 4.0Ah and 5.0Ah batteries

On the downside the new grinders are about 45mm longer and 400g heavier than the previous model, but neither of these bothered us much. As can be expected, the price is significantly higher than the old one at AU$250+ for the tool only.

Makita have hit a winner with this great grinder,and they’re one of the first to make one brushless. Can’t wait to see the brushless circular saw, jig saw and others that are bound to follow.

18V Planer Comparison – Makita BKP180 vs Bosch GHO 18V-Li

A cordless planer is not a tool that everybody sees a need for. Yet I bet that anyone who has used one won’t want to give it back. They really can be a pleasure to use, and the Makita and Bosch planers are exactly that.

The main specs are as follows:

Bosch GHO 18V-Li  –   2.6kg, 82mm blade, 1.6mm cut depth, 14,000RPM

Makita BKP180       –   3.3kg, 82mm blade, 2.0mm cut depth, 14,000RPM

The Makita’s extra weight is noticeable, but also excusable as you get a much heftier base plate that should serve tradies well. Other than this, the Bosch has two unusual features:

  1. It only has one cutting blade. This does keep blade cost and maintenance down, but is probably the reason it doesn’t have quite as much grunt, and a just-respectable cut capacity of 1.6mm
  2. It has left and right dust chutes! This means that users can direct the chips/dust in whatever direction is least annoying to clean up. It also make fitting a dust bag or dust extraction vac too easy.

Both machines gave a very sharp finish. Both gave very good run times (69.5m and 66.5m for the Bosch and Makita respectively on 3Ah batteries). The Bosch is often a little more expensive . The Makita has a more user-friendly safety-lock.

So, which do we recommend? Well, we love both. If keeping mess to a minimum is vital to you, then the Bosch. For everyone else, the Makita is probably the better choice.

Makita 18V DHP481Z Review – Brushless Hammer Drill

Write-up edited for accuracy upon further testing.

Makita has a tonne of 18V drills, and this isn’t the first brushless one. But it IS their first brushless heavy duty drill, and they are making some big claims about it, 125N.m. of claim.

Newton metres (N.m.) is how torque is measured, and that’s a good 50% more than any of it’s competitors claim. To quell your doubts about it”s torque, Makita have included a side-handle long enough you could unblock your toilet with it (not a suggestion).

We like the feel of this drill, and it certainly ripped through some redgum with a 16mm and 24mm auger bit. However it’s electronic protection seems to prevent it from shining in really intense torque tests. It was also able to pull down huge coach bolts into treated pine easier than competitors.

Does it live up to Makita’s claims? No it doesn’t, but it is a great drill Yep I think it does. The weight and length put it right inline with the competition, and the power is a cut above. So feel free to use the side-handle however you want. Ignore the side handle at your peril!